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Pointe-à-Callière, Montréal Museum of Archaeology and History

Pointe-à-Callière, Montréal.

Said to be situated on the very birthplace of Montréal, Pointe-à-Callière is the city’s museum of archaeology and history. A relatively new museum, it opened to the public in 1992. Nonetheless, the site on which the museum was built bears testimony to over one thousand years of human activity, beginning when indigenous peoples made camp here between the Little Saint-Pierre River and the St. Lawrence River. Some of the archaeology that was exposed during construction work for the building has been left in situ, and this now forms part of the museums permanent display on the history of the city.

Exhibits: History and Archaeology of Montréal and Quebec
Temporary Exhibitons

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The museum has both permanent and temporary exhibition spaces. The programme of temporary exhibitions is varied, including high profile travelling displays from the best museums around the World. Where Montréal Was Born is a permanent exhibition that guides visitors through authentic archaeological remains preserved in situ. A marked trail leads from one set of archaeological remains and artefacts to another, showcasing six hundred years of history. This trail begins with the archaeology of Native camps, and and moves on to Montréal’s first Catholic cemetery, used between 1643 and 1654 – the oldest construction in the city. Also part of the trail are vaulted stone tunnels, constructed in the 1830s to divert the flow of the Little Saint-Pierre River into the city’s sewer.

Coming in October 2013, Pirates or Privateers? – a permanent, immersive exhibition in the Ancienne-Douane building and designed specifically for children. With the help of a huge ship, which children will climb aboard, the exhibition explored the different worlds of Pirates and Privateers on the St Lawrence and their respective roles in the history of Montréal and Quebec.
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Photo Credit: © Gribeco, on Wikipedia