The Athens Acropolis

Acopolis Athens Icon
In 480 BC the Persians attacked Athens and destroyed the various buildings on the acropolis, including an unfinished Parthenon. Shortly after, at the navel Battle of Salamis, the Greeks led by the Athenian Themistocles defeated the Persians. Athens then took the lead in the alliance of Aegean City States, known as the Delian League. During the period that followed, a time that saw culture, philosophy and the arts flourish, a group of artists under the sculptor Pheidias transformed the ruins of the acropolis into what would become one of the world’s most important monuments from ancient times.

Buying Tickets for the Acropolis

Everything you need to know about buying tickets for the Acropolis, including what the Official Website does not tell you. Single entry tickets for the Acropolis can be booked online, in advance or you can buy a combined ticket for the major archaeological sites in the centre of Athens. For these step-by-step instructions are provided, along with information on how to buy-skip-the-line tickets

Visiting the Acropolis: Everything You Need to Know

Having bought your tickets, now you get to prepare for your visit with our tips for visiting the Acropolis. What is the best time of the day to visit? Which entrance should I use? How much time do I need to spend on the Acropolis to see everything? These are just some of the Frequently Asked Questions we provide the answers to. Everything you need to know before you go so you can enjoy your time there
The entrance to the Acropolis in Athens for wheelchair users.

The Acropolis & Accessibility

The custodians have gone to great lengths to make the Acropolis accessible to all. Recent measures have greatly improved access to the hilltop for those visitors with reduced mobility. In this article we outline what measures are in place, and how you access these. 

The Acropolis with Children

Parents visiting Athens can still enjoy a trip to the top of the Acropolis with their babies or young children. You do not need to do a lot of extra planning, certainly no more than you would usually do while on sightseeing with kids in a city. But there are a few things you should know about before you set off that will make your visit go more smoothly.

Walking & Guided Tours of the Acropolis

Whether you are looking for a guided tour of the Acropolis or just want to be able to skip the queues, there are many options to choose from. Well over 60 in fact. There are small group and private guided tours, walking tours in the morning or the late afternoon, some that include the Acropolis Museum. We have selected ten that we are happy to recommend, including an audio guide with skip-the-line tickets

Best Views of the Acropolis

This one is for the photographers looking for a stunning aerial view of the Acropolis at sunset or sunrise. Or anyone for that matter who wants to get a different perspective of this extraordinary ancient place. Athens is quite flat, but dotted about the city are a number of hills, of varying heights. Each of these offers an individual view of the rocky citadel, particularly at sunrise and sunset.

Virtual Tours of the Acropolis

Not able to get to the Acropolis yourself, why not explore this extraordinary archaeological site with a virtual tour? We have put together a collection of digital resources, including interactive maps, 3D reconstructions, an audio tour, YouTube videos, to enable you to build your own virtual experience wherever you are.

The Acropolis Museum

The new Acropolis Museum is a few hundred metres from the base of the southern side of the Acropolis. Opened to the public in 2009, the museum replaced the first museum of the Acropolis, which is on the citadel. Constructed above an archaeological site, the museum displays over 4,000 artefacts, but only from the Classical Greek and Roman periods. Despite this truncated presentation of the Acropolis’ history, a visit to the is an essential addition for anyone visiting the Acropolis. 

Sunset behind the Temple of Poseidon at Cape Sounion, Greece.

Beyond the Acropolis

The new Acropolis Museum is a few hundred metres from the base of the southern side of the Acropolis. Opened to the public in 2009, the museum replaced the first museum of the Acropolis, which is on the citadel. Constructed above an archaeological site, the museum displays over 4,000 artefacts, but only from the Classical Greek and Roman periods. Despite this truncated presentation of the Acropolis’ history, a visit to the is an essential addition for anyone visiting the Acropolis.