Thematic Guides

From Cave Art in France to Amphitheatres in the Roman World

The decorated caves in France are amongst the most well known in the World. There are over 25 caves open to the public, with a number in the Vézère Valley alone. This guide to the cave art of France, the most up-to-date, and the most comprehensive online, provides essential information whether you have a passing interest and want to visit just a few while on holiday, or you have a deeper interest and wish to see as many as you can. See Cave Art in France >>
 
A replica from the cave of Marsoulas, in the Parc Pyreneen de l’ Art Prehistorique

The decorated caves in France are amongst the most well known in the World. There are over 25 caves open to the public, with a number in the Vézère Valley alone. This guide to the cave art of France, the most up-to-date, and the most comprehensive online, provides essential information whether you have a passing interest and want to visit just a few while on holiday, or you have a deeper interest and wish to see as many as you can. See Cave Art in France >>

A replica from the cave of Marsoulas, in the Parc Pyreneen de l’ Art Prehistorique

Amphitheatres were built by the Romans throughout their Empire, and today some 230 are known about from Wales in the west, to Syria in the east, Scotland in the north, and Libya in the south. Built to impress, they are a defining feature of what would have been a wealthy Roman city or town. A number of well preserved examples are now still used to stage various spectator events. See Roman Amphitheatres >>
 
Bronze statue of a Matador in front of the Arènes de Nîmes

Amphitheatres were built by the Romans throughout their Empire, and today some 230 are known about from Wales in the west, to Syria in the east, Scotland in the north, and Libya in the south. Built to impress, they are a defining feature of what would have been a wealthy Roman city or town. A number of well preserved examples are now still used to stage various spectator events. See Roman Amphitheatres >>

Bronze statue of a Matador in front of the Arènes de Nîmes

Romano-British Villas were opulent country residences for the wealthy and political elite. Some were quite palatial, others more modest, but most were richly decorated with some of the finest artefacts surviving from the Roman era. This guide includes the various villas open to the public, and the many museums that have displays of villa archaeology – including the exquisite mosaic floors. See Romano-British Villas >>
 
Bucklersbury Mosaic, Museum of London

Romano-British Villas were opulent country residences for the wealthy and political elite. Some were quite palatial, others more modest, but most were richly decorated with some of the finest artefacts surviving from the Roman era. This guide includes the various villas open to the public, and the many museums that have displays of villa archaeology – including the exquisite mosaic floors. See Romano-British Villas >>

Bucklersbury Mosaic, Museum of London

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