The Hanseatic League

Cities & ports of the Medieval confederation of merchant guilds

Exploring the Cities & Ports of the Hanseatic League

The Hanseatic League was a 14th to 17th century confederation of merchant guilds and their market towns. Founded towards the end of the 12th century by a small group of German towns on the Baltic Sea, the league went on to include some two hundred towns and dominate maritime trade in northern Europe for around four hundred years. Ports and cities in the league stretched from, what was then, Prussia in the east to England in the west, present day Bergen (Norway) in the north to Krakow (Poland) in the south.

The name Hanse or Hansa was the Middle Low German word for a convoy, which is how bands of merchants travelled between cities and ports by land and sea – largely because of the risk of piracy on the seas. The Hanseatic League was founded as a union of a few north German towns to protect their guilds’ economic interests and improve trading conditions. Also to establish diplomatic ties and privileges along the trade routes merchants established with foreign trading posts (known as Kontors). Although Hanseatic cities had their own legal system and maintained their own armies for mutual protection and aid, they were not a Medieval state.

Many warehouses and other trade-related buildings used by the Hansa merchants survive in a number of former Hanseatic cities and kontors. This trade and maritime heritage is often promoted by tourist boards and historical associations. Many destinations have Hansa museums, historical trails and some even host a programme of events throughout the year commemorating significant historical dates in the history of the Hanseatic League.

Map of cities and trading posts in the Hanseatic League. Cities are grouped by Quarter: cities that were in the Wendish and Pomeranian Quarter are marked with red pins, Saxon, Thuringian and Brandenburg Quarter cities with light blue pins, Prussian, Livonian and Swedish (Baltic) Quarter cities with purple pins, and Rhine-Westphalian, Netherlands and Flanders (Westphalian) with pink pins. Foreign trading posts, or Kontors, are marked with yellow pins.

Hanseatic Kontors in England

King’s Lynn, Norfolk

During the 1100s King’s Lynn was fast becoming one of the most important port towns in Medieval England. The town’s location on the east coast, with access to an extensive system of inland waterways made it a very attractive port for merchant traders from Europe, including ships coming from cities within the Hanseatic League. Hanse House is the only surviving Hanseatic building in England. Kings Lynn was a Kontor, and the League acquired and developed the site in the late 1470s. It was here that German merchants had their offices and lodgings, shops and warehouses. Today visitors can enjoy a self guided trail of Hanseatic King’s Lynn.

Hanse House in King's Lynn, Norfolk.
Steelyard, London

The London Kontor, known as Steelyard, was the headquarters of the Hanseatic League in London, and once the largest Medieval trading post in Britain. A typical Hanseatic trading post, this was a private, walled community with warehouses on the river, a weighing house, counting houses, a chapel and residential quarters. No remains can be seen, but it was on the north bank of the Thames near Tower Bridge. Today, this is the site of Canon Street Station and a nightclub, ‘The Steel Yard’. During maintenance work at the station in 1988 archaeologists uncovered remains – some of which are on display in the Museum of London.

Siegburg drinking jug in the Museum of London.




The gabled roof of the town hall in Lübeck, the leading city of the Hanseatic League.

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