Destinations > Europe > England

The Great Bath at night in Bath, England.

Exploring the past in England

From the enigmatic Stonehenge in the south, to the monumental Hadrian’s Wall in the north. From Sutton Hoo in the east, to castles of the Welsh Marches in the west. From the industrial heritage sites in the north, to the many World War II sites along the southern coastline. England has a vast range of archaeology and history attractions, with something for everyone – whether you are pursuing your own interests or traveling on vacation. The earliest evidence of humans dates back to before the Last Glacial period. Beginning just before the end of the Ice Age on into the medieval period and beyond there were successive arrivals of people who brought with them new ways of living: the first farmers, the Romans, Saxons, Normans, as well as the African-Caribbean people in post-war Britain. All contributed to the diversity of archaeological and historical sites in England we visit today.

Visiting Sites & Museums in England in 2021

On 12 April 2021 some of the restrictions in England were lifted. People are advised to limit travel within England only for essential reasons, and there are severe restrictions for people travelling to England. For further details, check the relevant sections on the official Gov.UK Website.

Some archaeological and historical attractions have reopened. Others remain closed; this includes museums, art galleries, historic houses and castles. It is hoped many of these indoor attractions will re-open in May 2021. People are allowed to visit the gardens and parks of heritage sites, where these are accessible. In all situations, visitors are required to observe new measures and regulations in place. These are designed to protect both staff and visitors. Read more on the Guidelines for Visiting Sites and Museums in 2021 >>

Some of the Sites that have Re-opened in England

Inside the stone circle at Stonehenge at dawn.

Stonehenge

Ruins of the Roman town at Corbridge, Hadrian's Wall.

Corbridge Roman Town

The stairs of the King's Great Tower at Old Sarum, Salisbury.

Old Sarum

Ruins of Tintagel Castle on an overcast and dark day.

Tintagel Castle

Search for Archaeology and History Sites in England

Interactive map of England.

Interactive Map of England

Use the interactive map to search for archaeology and history sites and museums, landmarks and memorials and other points of interest around the country. The map allows you to find places of historical interest using a number of different functions. You can look at all the sites and museums within a single county, or you can find sites near your present location. You can search for places to visit within a specified radius of a named location, as well as refining that search to suit your interests. Although the map displays best on desktops and laptops, it can also be used on mobile devices – particularly to find sites and museums near your present location. Go to the map >>

Find Archaeology and History Sites and Museums in England, United Kingdom by County

Bedfordshire, Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Cambridgeshire, Cheshire, Cornwall & the Isles of Scilly, Cumbria, Derbyshire, Devon, Dorset, Durham, East Sussex, Essex, Gloucestershire, Greater London, Greater Manchester, Hampshire, Herefordshire, Hertfordshire, Isle of Wight, Kent, Lancashire, Leicestershire, Lincolnshire, Merseyside, Norfolk, Northamptonshire, Northumberland, Nottinghamshire, Oxfordshire, Rutland, Shropshire, Somerset, Staffordshire, Suffolk, Surrey, Tyne & Wear, Warwickshire, West Midlands, West Sussex, Wiltshire, Worcestershire, Yorkshire

City Guides for History Lovers

The goddess Sulis Minerva, found in the Roman baths in Bath.

BATH
From Roman Baths to Exemplary Georgian Architecture

The famous Clifton Suspension Bridge in Bristol, south west England.

BRISTOL
A City Shaped by Bridges & Boats for at Least a Thousand Years

Remains of the Medieval bridge in Exeter, Devon.

EXETER
A Roman Fortress Becomes a Prosperous Medieval Trading Post

Elizabeth Tower at the UK's Houses of Parliament.

LONDON
Walk Londinium’s Wall to London’s Gothic Grandeur