In the heart of red rock landscapes and canyonlands of south east Utah is the small resort town of Moab. One of the reasons many come to spend a few days here is to explore the archaeology and rock art. Not only are there a number of both petroglyph and pictograph sites in the area, these sites have images from a number of different periods of history from 5500 BC to the 1800s. This guide provides information for those who are looking to see just a few of the better sites as well as those would like to see as much as they can. The interactive map and directions can be used for self-guided rock art tours. Also included are details of rock art auto tours from Moab.

Reconstructed wattle and daub hut at Etowah Indian Mounds Historic Site.

A few of the larger anthropomorphic Barrier Canyon style pictographs that make up the Great Gallery in Horsehoe Canyon. Photograph © PDTillman/Wikimedia

When visiting rock art sites, whether in Moab or elsewhere, be mindful of the impact your visit makes. Not only do these sites suffer as a result of natural weathering processes, unfortunately the actions of visitors is not always ideal. Of course in some cases visitors are not fully aware of how destructive their actions can be.

Most people would not dream of adding graffiti to these panels, or recording the date of their visit. Without even thinking about it, and quite understandably, many do not know that you should not touch a painted or engraved image. After all these images have been exposed to the harsh elements for centuries. But that print your fingers leave on glass contains acids that can destroy not only pigments by the eroding rock surface. So the do not touch rule applies as much to engravings as it does to paintings.

Before setting off on your journey be mindful of and pay attention to local restrictions. And read the widely accepted etiquette for visiting rock art, and other archaeology, sites in our Rock Art Guide >>

Etiquette for Visiting Rock Art Sites

When visiting rock art sites, whether in Moab or elsewhere, be mindful of the impact your visit makes. Not only do these sites suffer as a result of natural weathering processes, unfortunately the actions of visitors is not always ideal. Of course in some cases visitors are not fully aware of how destructive their actions can be.

Most people would not dream of adding graffiti to these panels, or recording the date of their visit. Without even thinking about it, and quite understandably, many do not know that you should not touch a painted or engraved image. After all these images have been exposed to the harsh elements for centuries. But that print your fingers leave on glass contains acids that can destroy not only pigments by the eroding rock surface. So the do not touch rule applies as much to engravings as it does to paintings.

Before setting off on your journey be mindful of and pay attention to local restrictions. And read the widely accepted etiquette for visiting rock art, and other archaeology, sites in our Rock Art Guide >>

Map of Rock Art Sites Around Moab

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Visiting Moab? If you are planning a trip to Moab in south east Utah, check our Moab Travel Guide for History and Adventure Seekers.